• The Ultimate Guide to the Ringbolt Hot Springs in Arizona

  • Exploring the Ringbolt Hot Springs is an adventure like no other. From hiking through the colorful slot canyons made of red and gold volcanic rock and ash, to passing by the stunning emerald green Colorado river, to climbing up mini waterfalls, this hike will bring out your true wildjoy.

The Ringbolt Hot Springs, also know as the Arizona Hot Springs, is a 6 mile hike just south of the Hoover Dam in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. As you hike to the Ringbolt Hot Springs, you will pass through colorful slot canyons, walk along the Colorado River, crawl up mini waterfalls, and climb a ladder before you reach the four hot spring pools! This is a truly incredible adventure that is bucket list worthy!

In this guide, you will learn everything you'll need to know to have a successful hike to the Ringbolt Hot Springs in Willow Beach, Arizona!

Girl smiling in hot springs in arizona
Lacy sitting in the hot springs known as the Ringbolt Hot Springs in Arizona

Parking

We were prepared to pay a $25 parking fee at Ringbolt Hot Springs. However, there wasn't a ticket booth or a person collecting the fee, so we were able to park for free. I am unsure if this is only a temporary thing, so I would bring $25 cash for parking just in case!

You can find the parking lot for the trailhead by typing in "Arizona Hot Spring Trail" into your maps. You can also type in the coordinates of the trailhead into your maps.

Address: US-93 S, White Hills, AZ 86445

Coordinates: 35.980, -114.698

Parking at the Arizona Hot Springs Trailhead
Parking at the Arizona Hot Springs Trailhead

Preparing for the Hike

To have a successful hike, I recommend bringing lots of water and snacks. The hot springs will dehydrate and tire you if you aren't prepared! You can also bring a water filter to refill your water at the Colorado River! Additionally, it is windy in the slot canyon, so wear layers if you are hiking during the winter. Depending on the time of year you hike to Ringbolt Hot Springs, it's a good idea to pack sunscreen and a hat for maximum sun protection. You'll also want to wear watershoes that are suitable for hiking, or bring an extra pair of shoes for when you go into the hot springs.

The trails that lead to the Ringbolt Hot Springs are closed from May 15 - September 30, so plan to do this hike in the fall, winter or early spring. We hiked it during the second week of Januray with the temperature hovering between 50 and 60 degrees. We all wore sweatpants and some sort of long sleeve top with our bathing suits underneath. This way we were comfortable thoughout the hike and were still able to enjoy the hot springs without having to hike out with soaking wet clothes!

Safety information for hiking to the Ringbolt Hot Springs

The Hike to Ringbolt Hot Springs

There are two trails of which you can take to reach the hotsprings, the Arizona Hot Springs Trail and the White Rock Canyon Trail. We decided to take the White Rock Canyon Trail due to the fact that we would be climbing up the ladder to reach the hot springs versus climbing down the ladder after enjoying the hot springs. Climbing up the ladder feels more secure than climbing down, which is why we chose that route! I highly recommend hiking to the hot springs via the White Rock Canyon Trail for this reason. Additionally, you will be able to enjoy how the scenery changes along the trail!

Map of the trails at RIngbolt Hot Springs

As you leave the parking lot, the Arizona Hot Springs Trail and White Rock Canyon Trail will head down the same path for the first .5 miles or so until you reach a small fork in the path. To take the White Rock Canyon Trail, head to the right. If you wish to take the Arizona Hot Springs Trail, take a left.

The hike down to the hot springs was relatively easy. We hiked through slot canyons and a wash, which wasn't solid ground so it can be tiring to walk on. As long as you have sturdy and comfortable hiking shoes you should be fine!

Arizona Hot Springs, Lake Mead Recreation Area, Arizona
White Rock Canyon Trail at Ringbolt Hot Springs
White Rock Canyon Trail at Ringbolt Hot Springs

After about 2.5 miles, we came upon the Colorado River. We were greeted by ducks taking a break from their swim! There were also people kayaking down the river as we hiked by it. We took a small break here to take some pictures and skip some rocks - so beautiful!

The Colorado River at the Lake Mead Recreation Area, Arizona
The Colorado River from the White Rock Canyon Trail at Ringbolt Hot Springs

After we reached the Colorado River, we took a left to continue on the White Rocks Canyon Trail. This took us up into the rocks and we had to climb up a few mini waterfalls! It's a good idea to wear good hiking shoes, especially for this part of the trail so you don't slip!

Ian and lacy skipping stones along the Colorado River
You can even skip stones along the Colorado River along the White Rock Canyon Trail

Keep an eye out for yellow arrows on the canyon walls or metal trail signs to help stay on the right path!

At the Hot Springs

Eventually, you will come upon a twenty foot ladder that will lead you to the four hot springs! The ladder is reinforced at the top of the climb with a slack rope that will help you climb over the top and will also keep the ladder in place as you climb. Because of the nature of the ladder, it feels more secure to climb up the ladder rather than climb down, which is why I suggest taking the White Rock Canyon Trail to the hot springs instead of the Arizona Hot Springs Trail! As you climb up the ladder, you will refreshed by the waterfall spraying you!

Arizona Hot Springs, Lake Mead Recreation Area, Arizona
Ladder to the hot springs via the White Rock Canyon Trail at Ringbolt Hot Springs

As you climb over the top of the ladder, you will see the hot springs! There are four hot springs. The first one you will see will be the coolest, but is still pretty warm with an average temperature of 92 degrees. As you turn the corner, you will see the other three hot springs. They will get warmer as you move towards the top one. These hot springs have an average temperature between 100 degrees and 108 degrees! It feels like you're in a hot tub and is very relaxing, especially after hiking 3 miles to get there!

Be careful with how long you stay in the hot springs, as they will dehydrate you if you aren't prepared.

The Hike Out

We decided to take the Arizona Hot Springs Trail to get back to our car. This trail was about 2.5 miles and mostly uphill, unlike the hike down which was relatively flat.

Ringbolt Hot Spring near Boulder City, Nevada
The view from the Arizona Hot Springs Trail
Ringbolt Hot Springs near Boulder City, Nevada
The Arizona Hot Springs Trail

I recommend taking the Arizona Hot Springs Trail back to the parking lot instead of taking the White Rock Canyon Trail to change up the scenery! The Arizona Hot Springs Trail has a mostly sandy path but is very steep. Remember to listen to your body and take breaks when needed!

If you decide to hike back down the White Rock Canyon trail verses the Arizona Hot Springs trail, you need to climb down the sketchy ladder. You can see in the photo below on steep and dependent you are on the rope.

It took us around four hours to hike down to the hot springs, relax at the Colorado River and hot springs, and hike back to our car. You can also camp along the trail, if you do, bring extra snacks, water, and headlights!


I hope you enjoyed our guide to hiking to the Ringbolt Hot Springs near the Hoover Dam in Arizona! Be sure to tag @wildjoyexperiences and use #thejoyclub on Instagram so we can see your adventures!

xx -

Carmela + Lacy